Too Cold for Smoothies! ❄

I noticed this week that I’ve lost my taste for my daily smoothie – or at least I became aware that I needed another sweater after drinking it.

My smoothie was making me cold.

To clarify, my smoothie routine is an important player in my microbiome diversity program. Inspired by cutting-edge research that points to the value of increasing the number and diversity of beneficial bacteria in the gut, I have looked for ways to increase a wide variety of plant fibers in my diet.

These fibers provide a banquet for gut microbes to feast on, or ferment into short-chain fatty acids. Short-chain fatty acids in turn provide fuel for intestinal cells and microbes.

They also exert an anti-inflammatory on the body, protect the gut from pathogenic bacteria, improve absorption of minerals such as calcium and magnesium, and are associated with a lower risk for colon cancer.

So it makes sense that my smoothie was loaded with berries, greens, avocado, lion’s mane powder, and goat kefir.

But making my digestion cold as winter approaches left me feeling stiff and achy, the opposite of what I was trying to do. I scratched my head and thought, could I make a warm smoothie?

Of course! It’s called “SOUP!” 😅

So I tossed a pot on the burner, added a pint of broth, and opened the fridge.

Green beans, broccoli, mushrooms, brussels sprouts, spinach, ginger root, onion, and garlic – in the pot barely chopped – simmered until tender. I added a dollop of coconut cream, salt, pepper, and curry powder.

A whiz with the Vitamix and voilà! Warm Super Bug Diversity Smoothie!

After that, I squirmed into my big winter coat and sat outside in the sun, enjoying the marvelous concoction with childlike pleasure.

Shifting our diets as the colder months approach is just one of the steps towards preparing for winter.

To help us greet the darker days with a little more equanimity, I invited Deb Soule to share the practices that she has found helpful since she has wintered in Maine for 62 years.

Warming foods and herbs, guided meditations, and living in rhythm with the cycles of the sun were discussed in a Community Master Class on November 17, 2021. You can watch the replay inside the BotanicWise Community here.

In this masterclass you will learn:
  • Herbs to warm the body and support immunity
  • How to make “Immune Soup”
  • Self-care practices to nourish body and soul
  • Q&A at the end will give you a chance for more support

This master class with Deb will provide us all with nourishment, and some much-needed tools for our winter preparedness kit. After all, an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.

Deb Soule has such infinite wisdom in the ways of the world. The depth of understanding she has about everything from the soil under our feet to the moon above our heads is astounding. Yet, the ease with which she openly and lovingly shares her knowledge always leaves me feeling at peace with the world around me.

If you agree and feel such overwhelming gratitude that you’re looking for a way to give back, please make a donation to help support this event here: https://bit.ly/WelcomingWinterSupport


About Deb Soule

Deb Soule is an herbalist, gardener, teacher, and author of The Woman’s Handbook of Healing Herbs, How to Move Like a Gardener, and The Healing Garden.

She began organic gardening and studying the medicinal uses of herbs at age 16. Her faith in the healing qualities of plants includes a desire to make organic herbs easily accessible to women and families living in rural areas.

In the fall of 1985, with her first mail order catalog and a small selection of herbal extracts and teas, Deb launched Avena Botanicals, an apothecary that now serves thousands of customers.

Click here to watch the replay of Deb’s masterclass on Preparing for Winter!

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